Program

Wednesday April 21st - Friday April 23rd

Each of the six participating institutions have provided pre-recorded sessions and a virtual tour.  We have listed the titles, abstracts, and schedule below.  We will post links for viewing as of April 14 (one week prior to the Summit).  Please watch the sessions ahead of time, then join the live sessions for a Q & A with the presenters.  The Breakout Room Discussions will be theme-based, and attendees may choose which discussion to join. 

Wednesday April 21st 2:00-5:00 pm EST

Thursday April 22nd 2:00-5:00 pm EST

Friday April 23rd 2:00-5:00 pm EST

  • 2-3pm Panel discussion with speakers from all six institutions, Jan Guise, University of Toronto, moderator.
  • 3-4pm Breakout room discussions
  • 4-5pm Breakout room discussions

Abstracts, Virtual Library Tours and Presentations

Jim Farrington, University of Rochester, Eastman School of Music 

Managing user expectations with an abundance of space

The Sibley Music Library is the largest academic music library in North America. What started out in 1904 as a public music library in Rochester, Sibley merged its 9000 books and scores with the nascent Eastman School of Music in 1921. The following hundred years saw an explosion of acquisitions during which the library outgrew three physical spaces, opening the doors of its latest home in January 1989. The current building has 45,000 square feet of space housing some 650,000 physical items. A survey done in 2000 reported that we had only used about 1/3 of the available shelf space for the circulating collections (a statistic almost unimaginable in most libraries today). The long-standing support of the library from our administration combined with this abundance of shelf space for so much of the collection has lead to interesting collection development decisions with implications for user services.

Library Tour

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Presentation

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Sandi-Jo Malmon, Harvard University, Eda Kuhn Loeb Music Library and Ruthann Boles McTyre, Yale University, Gilmore Music Library

Collaborative Music Collections with Borrow Direct

The collaborative collection development plan that began in 2009 with music librarians from the 7 academic libraries of the Borrow Direct partnership has expanded over the past 10 years to include a total of 13 participating music libraries including those from the Ivy League and from MIT, Johns Hopkins, Duke, the University of Chicago and Stanford. The cooperative collection development plan for purchasing scores of contemporary composers has remained robust and truly collaborative as it has been updated to represent more broadly diverse collecting practices shared across institutions. Malmon and McTyre will discuss the history of this partnership as well as ongoing work to keep the collaboration and the collections fresh and relevant.

Yale Library Tour

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Presentation

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Keith Cochran, Indiana University, Bloomington

Acquiring Multiple Copies and Editions of Music Scores

I frequently make decisions about the quantity and types of editions that we need for scores in our collection. Because we serve an unusually large and diverse community, I often acquire multiple copies and multiple editions of the same work in order to meet the demands of users. In my talk, I will focus on several different works that can serve as case studies that illustrate the kinds of questions that I must answer on a regular basis about collection development and management. It is my hope that these case studies will be helpful to other librarians who regularly confront similar situations.

Library Tour

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Presentation

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Callie Holmes and Matthew Vest, University of California, Los Angeles, Herb Alpert School of Music

Maximizing Limited Space for Music Scores

The UCLA Music Library's physical collections have grown over 56 years from 36,000 to over 400,000 items while remaining in the same location. Strategies for housing the collection in limited space have evolved over time, including adding shelves, maximizing collections spaces, and moving items to a remote storage facility. Currently, each year we deaccession or move to storage approximately the same number of items that we acquire. Our process involves using circulation statistics to identify candidates for removal followed by collaborative item-by-item consideration, factoring in characteristics that cannot be determined via statistics, such as condition, current faculty and student research interest, and equity, diversity, and inclusion.

Library Tour

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Presentation

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Trevor Deck, Jan Guise, James Mason, Tim Neufeldt and Rebecca Shaw,  University of Toronto

What stays and what goes? Music Score Collection Assessment at the University of Toronto 

The Music Library at the University of Toronto is out of space.  Shelves are crowded, aisles are too narrow to navigate.  We make use of the UTL @ Downsview off-site storage facility, where approximately one-third of our music score collection is located.  The criteria and policies we use to determine what stays on-site and what goes to Downsview is outdated and not well communicated.  With a capital project renovation on the horizon, we need a clear understanding of what our collection looks like now, and what we want it to look like in a future space.  The University of Toronto Libraries are having important conversations about anti-racism and de-colonization in our spaces and collections, and we want to ensure our music score collection reflects the curricula and diverse programming of the Faculty of Music.  Normal weeding criteria such as publication date and circulation count are not appropriate for music scores, and there is little music-specific direction to be gleaned from the library literature.  Our team will share our process to date which includes data analysis and preparation for user surveys and focus groups. 

Library Tour

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Presentation

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Tour of Toronto Public Library Music Division