Citing Websites and Blogs

On this page:

  1. Websites
  2. Blogs

1. Websites

In most instances, references to webpages should be made to the host institution/organization/author's website, rather than individual pages (see CMS 14.206, 14.207). For original content from online sources that does not duplicate formally published documents, include as much of the following content as possible: author, title or description of the page, sponsor/owner of site, and a URL. A publication date, revision date and access date are also helpful, especially for sites like Wikipedia that are updated frequently. Citations to websites can often be limited to notes, with bibliographic citations as appropriate.

Examples:

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  • Microsoft Corporation. “WD2000: Visual Basic Macro to Assign Clipboard Text to a String Variable.” Revision 1.3. Microsoft Help and Support. Last modified November 23, 2006. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/212730.
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2. Blogs

Blogs (or, "weblogs") now generally consist of a few standard components, including titles, dated entries, and comments. Citing blog entries is therefore similar to citing online newspaper articles (see CMS 14.208). Blogs that are part of a larger publication should also include that publication's name. The word blog, if not in the title, should appear in parentheses after the blog title, as in example 2, below. Chicago style suggests that blog entries generally be relegated to notes rather than bibliographies, with frequently cited blogs listed under the blog heading itself.

Examples:

  • Pieczonka, Adrianne. "The Opera that Changed My Life: Tosca in the Flesh." Parlando: The COC Blog, Canadian Opera Company. June 5, 2017. http://www.coc.ca/COC-news1?EntryID=14998.
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  • Reynolds, Christopher. "Growing the Database of Women Songwriters, 1890-1930." Musicology Now (blog), American Musicological Society. September 21, 2015. http://musicologynow.ams-net.org/.